World Federation Against Drugs will participate in a high-level meeting in Buenos Aires, Argentina on December 3, 2014. The International President, Sven-Olov Carlson, will be the central figure at the high-level meeting at the Barceló University on drug prevention, treatment and enforcement, leading professionals from Argentina, Brazil and several other South American countries will also participate. 

A round table will open the event where the region's main problems regarding drugs and their possible solutions will be presented. Among the speakers will be Professor Mina Seinfeld de Carakushansky, WFAD Board member and President of BRAHA - Brazilian Humanitarians in Action; Calvina Fay, Executive Director of DFAF - Drug Free America Foundation; Jorge Jaber, President of ABRAD - Brazilian Association on Alcohol and Drugs; Jorge Gentile, renown Argentinean Judge and author; Neuza Amaral, Drug Prevention Secretary of Volta Redonda, Brazil; as well as the local Coordinators of the event including Juan Alberto Yaria, Director of Gradiva and Roberto Baiestrocchi of Barceló University; Claudio and Luis Viale from Mariten Foundation; and Diana Gomez, in addition to many other high representatives from universities, religious, political, social and family associations.

For more information contact WFAD board member This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Thank you Ambassador Shaama.

Distinguished Representatives of the members states,

Colleagues form the NGO sector,

Ladies and Gentlemen,

I speak on behalf of San Patrignano, World Federation Against Drugs, European Cities Against Drugs, European Action on Drugs, Drug Policy Futures and Recovered Users Network

We welcome the support of the member states to a meaningful and inclusive participation of the Civil Society in the preparation for the special session of the General Assembly on the world drug problem to be held in 2016.

We congratulate the Chair for the non-paper on the thematic discussions that should be addressed at the UNGASS meeting, and in this regard we would like to highlight the following thematic areas that we believe should be addressed by the member states with special attention:

-          Drug prevention

-          Recovery oriented treatment, including effective social reintegration

-          Enhanced cooperation between the Criminal Justice system and the Health system, Alternative sanctions empowering people to become drug-free, crime-free and integrated members of society

We would like to have the broad spectrum of civil society represented in the discussions we therefore support the creation of the Civil Society Task Force and we look forward to contribute to the Task Force.

In summery we put forward the following principles as an input to the UNGASS preparations:

-          Drug policies should prevent initiation of drug use.

-          Drug policies must respect human rights, for users and non-users alike, as well as the principle of proportionality.

-          Drug policies should strike a balance of efforts to reduce the use of drugs and the supply of drugs.

-          Drug policies should protect children from drug use.

-          Drug policies should ensure access to medical help, treatment and recovery services.

-          Drug policies should ensure access to controlled drugs for legitimate scientific and medical purposes.

-          Drug policies should ensure that medical and judicial responses are coordinated with the goal of reducing drug use and drug-related consequences.

All the above mentioned points are to be considered in full respect of the existing UN drug conventions, which we fully support in their current form.

Thank you for your attention! 
SLum Child Foundation is every year arranging a Student convention on Drugs, this year the convention gathered 250 students, both boys and girls. 

The Student convention is an open forum for high school students more so the girls from poor urban settlements in Kenya to come together and share on the best methodologies to curb the menace of drugs with key focus on social and psychological challenges they face in high school with other stakeholders in drug and substance abuse related fields. Through the convention which will is held annually the participants will get to learn and be in a position to engage the speakers in a plenary session with questions and sharing ranging from social to policy based in the fields of drugs and substance abuse.

The Convention seeks to create awareness to young girls in from the major poor urban settlements, otherwise known as slums in Nairobi, Kenya. The purpose is to address the many issues affecting girls both in and out of school that include but not limited to school dropout, poor performances in school among girls, prostitution, teenage marriage and pregnancies, HIV/AIDS and many more just but to mention a few.

The 2014 Convention managed to reach 250 participants, both boys and girls. A few girls went home with sanitary towels that were enough to take them for a term.

At the Convention Slum Child Foundation also handed out the Smart Girl Award. It is an initiative that aims at identifying, recognizing and awarding the efforts of young girls in schools from the slums, who are determined to go an extra mile and leave no stone unturned for the sake of helping other girls and to overcome the challenges they are facing as a result of poverty in the slums with regards to education and social life. It is the second year that Slum Child Foudnation is handing out the award. Convention 2014

The marijuana legalization tidal wave continues to roll across the United States with many groups advocating for a variety of more permissive marijuana laws. The goal of these policies is the commercialization and regulation of marijuana similar to the models of alcohol and tobacco. The tremendous funding of these political initiatives comes from the pro-drug lobby, made up of groups that seek to legalize all drugs of abuse, beginning with marijuana.

In the November, 2014 election, advocates for marijuana legalization made progress in passing ballot initiatives to legalize marijuana in the states of Alaska and Oregon and in the District of Columbia. These victories were not landslides. It is encouraging that the public in these areas were divided because it means that there remains opposition to marijuana legalization, despite the immense amount of money pouring into states to pass these initiatives.

Over the past decade, the pro-drug lobby has lost far more of these initiatives than it has won but the media picks up only those that succeed, with the implication that these initiatives are easily sweeping the country. The pro-drug lobby is utterly undeterred by its many losses. It returns to each election cycle with more money, better strategies and more target states for the legalization of both “medical” marijuana and recreational marijuana.

The recent creation of Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM) and the tireless work of its remarkably skilled co-founders Kevin Sabet, Ph.D. and former Congressman Patrick Kennedy has provided steady, on-the-ground, national leadership in the resistance to the pro-drug lobby’s campaign of mounting ever more effective counterattacks.

The ensuing disastrous consequences of marijuana legalization in Colorado, while still largely ignored by the media, as well as the similar disaster of “medical” marijuana in states with broadly open access and dispensaries like California and Colorado, have the potential to wake up the sleeping American majority. A new Gallop poll shows that support for marijuana legalization in the US has declined 12 percent from 2013 to 2014. This change provides evidence that marijuana legalization is not inevitable.

A swing away from this disastrous policy may already be underway. We are seeing a backlash to marijuana legalization. In this election, five cities in Colorado banned marijuana dispensaries and the “medical” marijuana initiative in the state of Florida did not pass. I remain optimistic about the eventual outcome of this political struggle for the future of American drug policy.

Robert L. DuPont, M.D.
President, Institute for Behavior and Health, Inc.
Board Member, World Federation Against Drugs
Former Director, National Institute on Drug Abuse (1973-1978)
Former White House Drug Chief (1973-1977)

On August, 23, Kevin Sabet made an excellent presentation by the title: “The Impact of Drug Legalization”. He showed the latest data on the negative effects of the Colorado´s State drug policy and presented shortly the main points of his book “Reefer Madness – the Seven Myths about Marihuana”
Kevin Brazil
The event took place at the impressive São Paulo State Palace called “Palacio dos Bandeirantes” in front of an audience of about 1500 people with an impeccable organization. The initiative and all the coordination was undertaken by Dr. Ronaldo Laranjeira of UNIAD, which is a WFAD member contributing to counteract the misinformation done generally by the Brazilian Press on issues regarding drugs.

Kevin’s presentation was informative and useful to all those who strive for a society with no drug use, because it showed everyone in the audience that NO DRUG Legalization is the way to go.

Although I live far away from São Paulo, I attended the Conference in São Paulo, in my capacity of Prevention Director of ABRAD (a member of the WFAD) and as President of BRAHA- Brazilian Humanitarians in Action, thanks to the encouragement of ABRAD President, Jorge Jaber.

At the event strong and clear messages were conveyed by Jose Serra, Ex-Governor of São Paulo and ex-Minister of Health and now a candidate for the Brazilian Senate, as well as by two other State Secretaries of São Paulo. The interview on Brazil’s biggest news site, here, received about 20 million clicks.

Mina Seinfeld de Carakushansky, WFAD Board member

pdfDownload PDF

World Federation Against Drugs recognizes that the fundamental goal of drug policy is to reduce the nonmedical use of drugs of abuse because nonmedical use of these drugs is harmful, and often fatal, to drug users and for society as a whole. Sound drug policies must be affordable, practical and consistent with contemporary values. The legalization of currently illegal drugs for nonmedical use will increase their use, and thus drug legalization is inconsistent with the public health goal of reducing drug use.

WFAD supports many good new ideas to reduce nonmedical drug use including promotion of effective prevention strategies and using the criminal justice system to promote prevention, treatment and recovery.

The Global Commission on Drug Policy released their latest report with recommendations for drug policy on September 8, 2014. The World Federation Against Drugs, WFAD, welcomes an open and honest debate around drug policy especially in light of the United Nations General Assembly Special Session on Drugs, UNGASS, that will be held in 2016. WFAD is guided by the 1961, 1971 and 1988 UN drug conventions and the resolution resulting from the UNGASS-meeting of 1998. We believe that the UN conventions provide the necessary platform for international cooperation to reducing non-medical drug use, a major global epidemic with serious public health and public safety consequences.

WFAD also adheres to Article 33 in the United Nations Conventions on the Rights of the Child that states: “ States Parties shall take all appropriate measures, including legislative, administrative, social and educational measures, to protect children from the illicit use of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances as defined in the relevant international treaties, and to prevent the use of children in the illicit production and trafficking of such substances.”

In the foreword, the Global Commission on Drugs Policy asks that the political declaration from the UNGASS 2016 not aim at solving the drug problem. The Commission reiterates that the international community needs to come to terms with the reality that easy answers to the drug problem do not exist. WFAD would like to remind the Commission that the preamble of the Single Convention recognizes that “addiction to drugs constitutes a serious evil for the individual and is fraught with social and economic danger to mankind”. Illicit drugs are a threat to the health and welfare of mankind. Recognizing this threat, the global community must work toward the goal of a drug-free world, very much as it works toward the goals of a cancer-free, poverty-free and crime-free world. The ambitious drug-free goal is neither utopian nor impossible. The Commission settles for lesser goals, which inhibit more effective solutions. Big goals produce big and well-targeted efforts. Small goals lead to small increments only.

We must strive for a drug-free world, not because it is easy but because it is hard!

WFAD agrees with the Commission that public health, community safety, human rights and development should be at the center of drug policy. We welcome the emphasis that the Global Commission puts on ensuring access of essential medicines. Too many people live without access to essential medicines and removing obstacles to these medicines should be of priority for the member states.. This is also one of the aims of the drug conventions; therefore WFAD encourages member states to ensure that the conventions fulfill their purpose, to ensure the availability of controlled medicines to the whole world.

WFAD also welcomes the debate around human rights in drug policy. We support the abolition of the death penalty for drug related crimes. [1] Unfortunately the respect for human rights is not universal and violations on human rights should be fought in every case. Treatment should be guided by human dignity, human rights and be evidence-based; an even more important aspect if the treatment is compulsory. The respect for human life and human dignity is highlighted in the three drug conventions, and there is nothing in the drug conventions that stand in contradiction to human rights; they are written to be a complement. We therefore welcome a debate in UNGASS 2016 on how the respect for human rights can better be followed by member states and welcome as an outcome from the meeting the recommendation of proportionality which allows for treatment, education, aftercare, rehabilitation or social integration as an alternative to conviction or punishment from the meeting.

In contrast to the Global Commission on Drugs, WFAD sees no contradiction between the criminal system and the health system. Seeing the future of drug policy as a choice between the criminal justice system and the health system is not only false, it fails to recognize the complementary nature of these two vital systems. Together they can achieve goals that neither can achieve alone.

The Commission suggests that different models of regulation of drugs should be applied to reduce social and health harms and disempower organized crime. The Commission recognizes that use of drugs can be increased if drugs are legalized but claims that the totality of associated social and health harms is likely to decrease. The Commission claims that lessons should be learnt from the experiences with alcohol and tobacco, which they claim are drugs that are produced and transited largely without problem.

Overlooked in the report is the fact that worldwide 3.3 million people die every year due to the harmful effects of alcohol [2] and tobacco kills nearly 6 million people every year[3]. The World Health Organization, WHO, states that tobacco use is responsible for the death of about 1 in 10 adults worldwide. [4] It is estimated that around 500.000 children are working on tobacco plantations around the world, in direct violation of the children’s right to be protected from economic exploitation and from performing any work that is likely to be hazardous, as stated in Article 32 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child. [5] Over one quarter of exported cigarettes disappear into the illegal market. [6]

According to WHO, the production of alcohol for export is concentrated to the hands of a few companies mostly based in developed countries. These companies spend heavily on marketing to stimulate demand for alcohol beverages. With the decrease of demand in developed countries they have intensified their marketing towards establishing new markets, for example low-income countries, women and young people who traditionally abstained or consumed very little alcohol. The new markets are recognizing alcohol for its revenue-generating profit but the substantial costs of alcohol-related problems are uncounted. [7] Despite a strict regulation of alcohol and tobacco, as for example in Sweden, most minors have access to alcohol and tobacco. There is no reason to believe that a regulated market for cannabis, heroin and cocaine will be any more successful to limiting these products to adults.

The essential question that must be asked is if the most effective way to reduce the extensive harms of illicit drugs is through legal regulation as suggested by the Commission. The global experience with alcohol and tobacco demonstrates that they are not examples of great success of regulated functioning markets. There is no data to support that a regulated market for cannabis, heroin and cocaine will be any different from alcohol and tobacco. If lessons should be learnt from alcohol and tobacco it is that legalization of drugs will increase supply of drugs, create an extensive black market and that companies will market drugs to minors and within developing countries.

The pathway towards an enlightened drug policy cannot be achieved through legalization of drugs; instead it must harness the criminal justice system to reinforce prevention, thwart drugs markets, and facilitate entry into treatment – while restricting prolonged incarceration to egregious and repeat offenders. The criminal justice system plays an integral role in drug use prevention by protecting public safety, reducing the availability of drugs and discouraging drug use and leveraging people to treatment.

There is much work to be done globally to solve the world drug problem, but if not aiming to solve the problem, there is little evidence that we will come closer to reaching this goal.

To summarize WFAD supports the following principles to serve as a platform for the drug policy debate:

· Drug policies should prevent initiation of drug use.

· Drug policies must respect human rights (for users and non-users alike) as well as the principle of proportionality.

· Drug policies should strike a balance of efforts to reduce the use of drugs and the supply of drugs.

· Drug policies should protect children from drug use.

· Drug policies should ensure access to medical help, treatment and recovery services.

· Drug policies should ensure access to controlled drugs for legitimate scientific and medical purposes.

· Drug policies should ensure that medical and judicial responses are coordinated with the goal of reducing drug use and drug-related consequences. [8]








[8] Drug Policy Futures principals can be found in full here:

Hepatitis is a global epidemic but little is known of its symptoms, prevention, complication and the great dangers it pose to this generation and the unborn generations. Government and other development partners have always taken matters like this unserious thereby fueling viral hepatitis which is on the increase.

This year WHD is a very important period for our government and other actors to play their own part most especially with the theme of 2014 “Hepatitis, Think Again” which is calling on the various stakeholders to play a very important role to see that viral hepatitis is controlled. Read the full report.

Beacon Youth Initiative
At Preporod today, after 8 years of supporting and helping addicts and their families, we are satisfied with what we have achieved and see many of our aims realised. We see revived the lives of many young people who have turned to us, and entire families revived. Over this time, addicts from all over Montenegro have turned to Preporod for help. Ever since it was established, the number of people turning to Preporod for help has been constantly growing which, on one hand is gratifying, given that we are in a position to help a larger number of addicts, but on the other hand it points to a problem which is a worldwide trend, and that is that the scale of the problem of drugs is constantly growing, especially among young people. These days we have the opportunity to also concentrate on the accomplishments of the last few years. From June 2013 to June 2014 Preporod has been an address where help, support and advice have been sought by 118 individuals, whether addicts or members of their families. We are noticing that the services most used during this period by our clients are motivational interviews for acceptance of long-term residential treatment (33.8%), free telephone line (16.1%), as well as counselling for parents of active addicts (15.3%). The percentage of males making use of our services (66.1%) is higher than for women (33.9%). It is also gratifying that, after the process of motivation, we have directed more than half (52%) of those used our motivational interview services to long-term residential treatment in communes all over Europe. Also, 3.4% of the total number contacted Preporod in order to use our counselling service for addicts who have the blood-transmitted infections HCV/HIV, 6.4% for the possibility of psychotherapy, and 4.2% for help for resocialisation. We are of the opinion that, with our earlier introduction of the first free SOS telephone line in Montenegro for addicts and their families, we have significantly increased the possibility of them contacting our organisation, and thereby, increasing the accessibility of the services that we offer, which is testified to by the fact that the line was called almost 90 times during the mentioned time period.

Cooperation with rehabilitation centres and communes in the country, the wider region and even further afield is still operating at a high level. Thanks to the projects we have realised in the last year, we have widened our cooperation even to state institutions. We believe that this approach does much to broaden awareness about the seriousness of this problem, and also to create the possibility to act together and more holistically. We believe that our organisation has been able to act in the best possible way in each individual case, or at least the best way that we have known. We will continue to search for the best solutions and method so as to best effect a reduction in the total number of addicts, and to bring our influence to bear on our society becoming a healthier place. Membership of European and worldwide umbrella institutes and partnerships with organisations from all continents are making our mission much easier.

Finally, we consider that it is important for us to be conscientious and aware, and to that end, every one of us should act, without prejudice, with clear understanding that our approach is never neutral, but that our inactivity can lead to a produženja stanja onakvog kakvim ono ne treba biti. We shoud be aware that the problem of an individual, for example a single drug addict, is a problem for the whole family, and eventually the whole of society. The problem of addiction has become an obvious problem that we should turn our attention to. For those affected by this illness, help and attention are neecessary, not only today while everyone is talking about it, but rather every day.

Thank you to all who have in any way helped our fight prevail and helped Preporod to be in the position it is.

In cooperation with Foundation for a Drug Free World, GRANAT conducted its pilot Train the Trainers on April 15 – 17 this year at the mountain resort of Lembang, West Java.

On the first day, BNN (National Narcotics Board) West Java provincial chapter conducted classes on regulations (anti drugs law), discussion on rehabilitation for drug users as victim, as well as updates on statistical record of drug abuse and trafficking.

The Truth About Drugs were delivered by the FDFW team which enlightened everyone’s mind, including those of BNN Officials.

The training gets serious attention from the authorities as evidenced by the present of BNN Chairman.

All attendees got certificate of attendance which allows them to deliver the same training to the community. Further, at the end of the course, everyone signed off the pledge declaring their “obligation” to provide counselling on the harmful effect of drug abuse to community.

More similar trainings to be done in other provinces across the country, aimed at reducing drug demands in Indonesia.

GRANAT welcome all members of WFAD to participate or support the program. Kindly contact Tony Parbudi on email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

UGANDA ALCOHOL POLICY ALLIANCE (UAPA). Media Presentation by Uganda Alcohol Policy Alliance (UAPA) on the occasion to commemorate the International Day Against Drug Use and Illicit Trafficking. World Drug Campaign theme is: Drug use disorders are preventable and treatable. Venue: Ibamba Restaurant, Kamwokya Date: Thursday, June 26, 2014.

Click here to read this material (PDF).

Uganda Youth Development Link

Page 4 of 9